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Archive for June, 2005

Summer 2005 Schedule

Schedule for the summer of 2005

Move out of Southbourne house

Aug 7th to Sept 11th
– Australia
Image hosted by Photobucket.com

Move into Ringwood house

As I am sure you can see, its going to be both a busy and relaxing summer!! But I shall endeavour to stay in touch. If you want info about the type of Summer school, you can click on the required place and the appropriate website will open in a new window…
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Year Chapel Sermon

Who! What! Why?

1. who you are!

Colossians 3:1-4
v1 Since, then, you have been raised with Christ, set your hearts on things above, where Christ is seated at the right hand of God.
v2 Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things.
v3 For you died, and your life is now hidden with Christ in God.
v4 When Christ, who is your life, appears, then you also will appear with him in glory.

a. v3 – you died – past tense
b. v1 – raised with Christ – present tense
c. v3 – your life is now hidden with Christ – present tense
e. v4 – Christ, who is your life – present tense
e. v4 – appear with him in glory. – future tense

Remember you are His ambassadors as well as ambassadors of the College, even during vacation time!

2. what you do!

2 Timothy 4:5 – But you, keep your head in all situations, endure hardship, do the work of an evangelist, discharge all the duties of your ministry.

a. Be steadykeep your head in all situations. We do this by reading God’s word and praying. The more we do it, the more we want to do it. The less we do it, less we feel like doing it, even though we should be doing it. Keep reading Christian books to expand your thinking yet keeping your doctrine and faith pure.
b. Persevereendure suffering & hardship. It comes to us all. Paul was at the point of being martyred. Tradition tells us he was beheaded soon after this letter was written. Revelation 21:4 – He will take your head in His hands and wipe away your tears…
c. EvangeliseWe are not all called to be evangelists, but we are all called to spread the good news of Jesus. When waking up in the morning, as part of your prayers ask for opportunities to arise where you can share your faith with others. People really are interested in discussing religion and in particular about your point of view and why you are at a bible college.
d. Work do your duty – God wants you fulfil your chosen ministry – whether that is youth work, kids work, family work etc. It may or may not be successful, but God is not interested in that – He requires faithfulness to Himself, and “success” will surely follow if we are faithful to Him.

3. why you do it!

2 Timothy 4:8 – Now there is in store for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, will award to me on that day—and not only to me, but also to all who have longed for his appearing.

v8 crown of righteousness, our award and reward. This is our prime motivation. God declaring us righteous so that we may live with Him forever and ever and ever (Rev 21:1-4).

Revelation 21:1-4
v1 Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea.
v2 I saw the Holy City, the new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride beautifully dressed for her husband.

v3 And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Now the dwelling of God is with men, and he will live with them. They will be his people, and God himself will be with them and be their God.
v4 He will wipe every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away.”

Remember…

It maybe vacation time from College, but not vacation time to stop remembering

who you are!
what you do!
why you do it!


Dave G Roberts 28/06/2005

LICC – Word for the Week – At arm’s length

People were also bringing babies to Jesus to have him touch them. When the disciples saw this, they rebuked them. Luke 18:15

Children in general, and babies in particular, are sometimes seen as inappropriate and out of place in an adult world. They are embarrassing, make a lot of noise and demand attention and responses we have either never learnt or have long forgotten. They distract us from serious conversation and make us lose our place. In the office, on the rush hour train or in the seminar we are irritated; we expect them to be kept to certain times and places where those of us who live seriously involved and important lives can briefly enter a softer world.

Human societies are practised at deciding certain groups are inappropriate or in the wrong place – women in pulpits, mothers and babies on trains, the elderly, certain ethnic groups, the disabled, the homeless. They may challenge our sense of identity or demand extra consideration in a very busy world. There are a fair number of churches that, in all but their written notices, give the impression that children are inappropriate attenders at Sunday worship.

Inappropriate? Absolutely not, said Jesus. They are to be encouraged – let the mothers bring them right into the centre of the group. The disciples, I trust, were really embarrassed as Jesus held and blessed these babies and children.

But this wasn’t just a rather touching interlude. Jesus was still teaching even as he held them. The children were not only welcomed for their own sakes, but also to back up his statement that the truth of the matter is unless we receive the Kingdom of God ‘like a little child’, we will never enter it. So we had better look hard at the children we know and meet; we had better welcome them and begin to learn the lessons that God wants us to learn from them. No pretence? Lack of guile? Simplicity? Innocent trust? Lack of self-importance? If we can learn some lessons from an unexpected source, then we may learn to look differently at other groups, or individuals, we tend to ignore or exclude.

Margaret Killingray

so another year completed…

No more lectures…
All essays/assignments completed…
Holidays to plan…
Plenty of coffee to imbibe…Time for music and dance…

‘Earthy evangelist’ changes US climate

Europe’s environmental activists are not renowned for their faith in the power of prayer. But in the run-up to the G8 summit they should put their hands together for the Rev Richard Cizik. One of America’s senior evangelical leaders, the lanky Virginian preacher is an unlikely ally of the Greens given the Christian Right’s reputation for being in lockstep with the White House.

The Bush administration is famously sceptical over global warming and greenhouse gas emissions and notoriously cosy with big business, especially the oil companies. Mr Cizik is, however, in the vanguard of a striking new movement: evangelicals prodding President George W Bush to take action on global warming. And his stance cannot easily be dismissed as radical nonsense, as the Green cause is traditionally mocked by the Right. He is the Washington representative for the National Association of Evangelicals, America’s largest evangelical group. With 30 million members, the NAE is possibly the most powerful voting bloc in the country.

“It is,” Mr Cizik concedes, “a head-turner.” But, he points out, there are two pressing reasons for evangelicals to lobby for the environment: first, the Bible enjoins man to look after what God created; second, the poor may be the first to suffer from climate change.

“When we die and each one of us meets our maker, He is not going to say, ‘How did I create the world?’ He is going to say, ‘What did you do with what I created?’ And why do I know that? Because Genesis 2:15 says we are stewards in charge of creation ‘to watch over it carefully’. How can you ‘love your neighbour as yourself’ if you are willing to let millions be subject to flooding and droughts caused by greenhouse gases which we, Americans, are responsible for?”

Nicknamed the “earthy evangelist”, Mr Cizik has to tread carefully. His comments have provoked outrage from some Right-wing congressmen and church leaders. The NAE position is heresy to many in the White House, which has close links to major corporations. A senior aide, who previously worked as a lobbyist for the oil industry, recently resigned after rewriting government papers to play down the threat of global warming. Inevitably he went to work for Exxon Mobil, the oil company.

Ted Haggard, the NAE president and senior pastor of the giant New Life Church, in Colorado Springs, the evangelical capital of America, takes part in a telephone conference call with the White House every Monday, but he does not force his views on the presidency. “I’ve never brought it up. . . I think they’ve read about it. . . and they are very respectful.” He also distances himself from environmentalists. “I do not return their calls. We are not their allies.”

Mr Cizik, who now drives a hybrid Toyota Prius car, is more critical about the role of the oil companies. After years of reflection he decided at a conference in Oxford in 2002 that the science linking global warming to greenhouse gases was incontrovertible. He says only “genuine contrarians” and “those on the payroll of multi-billion-dollar corporations who have vested interest in taking no action” dispute it now. After persuading prominent evangelicals to endorse a sweeping document, For the Health of the Nations, that talks ambiguously of the need to “protect God’s creation” he is trying to gain support for a statement on global warming. The new environmental drive is prompting a reappraisal of the Christian Right, as it becomes clear that the stereotype of them as a unified army is inaccurate.

Mr Cizik is confident that the mood in the pews is far more “green” than in the pulpits. Senior officials in Brussels see the conversion of some of the American religious Right to the cause of fighting climate change as one of several indications that public opinion in America is changing rapidly. EU officials admit that the Kyoto protocol is dead, as far as America is concerned. But they are increasingly optimistic that talks could begin on some form of post-2012 global climate treaty arrangement that would include America, and possibly China and India, within a year or two.

editorial@telegraph-usa.com

LICC – Word for the Week – Being whole

word for the week – being whole

Which is easier: to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Get up and walk’? But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins.’ He said to the paralysed man, ‘I tell you, get up, take your mat and go home.’ Luke 5:23,24

Jesus sat teaching in a house packed out with very serious men – teachers of the law from far and wide as well as his disciples. Then down through the roof above their heads a paralysed man lying helpless on a mat was lowered down to lie at Jesus’ feet. A desperate man with determined friends, definitely not bothered with the serious teaching and discussion going on. Jesus simply said to him, ‘Friend, your sins are forgiven’. A tense moment had become even tenser – the shock of blasphemy, a horrified intake of breath, silence, and all of them thinking, ‘Who can forgive sins but God alone?’. And what was in the minds of the helpless man and his friends? Is
that all they had come for, just forgiveness!

A friend of mine spent some time on a ward at Stoke Mandeville Hospital, because someone else had fallen asleep at the wheel of a car. A number of the other young men on the ward had paralysed themselves – and sometimes hurt or killed others – because they had been drunk driving cars or motorbikes, or leaping into swimming pools. Perhaps this paralysed man in
front of Jesus faced the same kind of double anguish of remorse, regret and guilt about his own condition and that of others. What kind of healing did he need most?

Finding even the beginnings of forgiveness, peace of mind and conscience, can be far more crucial for our ‘health’, our wholeness and well-being, than having our various physical or social needs met. Jesus knew this damaged man’s heart and his desperate need, as well as the hearts of those watching. So he demonstrated his authority for all to see and told him to get up and go
home.Sometimes we have to ask ourselves what kind of healing we, and others, need. And sometimes we need to seek out those who have hurt us to offer forgiveness so that they too can begin to find healing from the Lord who knows all and forgives all.

Margaret Killingray

LICC – Word for the Week – It’s not fair

word for the week – it’s not fair

But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made. She came to him and asked, ‘Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help.’ Luke 10:40

Work at home or away offers us many opportunities to indulge in resentment. There is always something to complain about, if we look hard enough. Jesus stopped off in the house of Martha and Mary and triggered a classic domestic row.

Actually some of us would rather bustle than sit and listen to challenging teaching; rather do the washing up than produce an arresting paragraph; rather be a postman than a poet. There is stress in thinking, having to shape articles for tight schedules, or work on designs or lesson plans. There is something restful in deleting files, emptying the dishwasher, or in any of the other daily tasks that can be done without thinking. But while doing the washing up or sorting out the stationery cupboard, we want others to notice us and feel bad that they are not helping. Self-righteousness comes too easily to some of us.

I am not sure what Jesus meant by telling Martha, ‘Only one thing is needed’. Did he mean that she was ‘making a meal’ of the meal and should settle for bread and cheese? Or did he mean that she, like Mary, should be making the most of his time with them, listening and learning? Kitchens, like the poor, are always with us. It is hard to hear the gentlest of rebukes when feeling hard done by. Did Martha change from self-righteous indignation to reproved humility, stop the unnecessary bustling and take her place at his feet? May we all be open to rebuke from the Lord, as well as from others. And may we recognise in ourselves the desire to make others feel uncomfortable.

Margaret Killingray

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